High School Principal

Lynn Fredericks
928.738.1405
hs@hjshs.org

Junior High Principal

Alban Naha
928.738.1410
jhs@hjshs.org

SPED Director

Pamela Engstrom
928.738.1420
sped@hjshs.org

Registrar & Transcripts

John Lomavaya
928.738.1415
registrar@hjshs.org

Attendance Clerk

Dione Naha
928.738.1416
attendance@hjshs.org

Teen Clinic

Andreana Burton
928.738.1424
health@hjshs.org

Parent/Student Handbook for 2018-2019

The Parent/Student Handbook for this current school year outlines the rights and responsibilities of our school community. It was approved by the Interim Governing Board on July 11, 2018.

School Improvement Plan

Our School Improvement Plan aligns with our goals for Teaching and Learning, Operations, and School Culture.

Course Offerings and Academic Programs

Hopi Jr./Sr. High School does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability in admission to its programs, services, or activities, in access to them, in treatment of individuals, or in any aspect of their operations. The limitation of English language skills shall not be a barrier to admission or participation in the district’s activities and programs. Hopi Jr./Sr. High School also does not discriminate in its hiring or employment practices.

Counseling
The academic guidance counselors are available to all students and parents/guardians who wish to discuss academic or social concerns. Any parent or guardian who needs to consult a counselor should call the school for an appointment.

Grading System
The following grading scales is in effect at Hopi Jr./Sr. High School:

Grading Scale – Letter Grade
• A = 90-100%
• B = 80-89%
• C = 70-79%
• D = 60-69%
• F = Below 60%

In the event of new courses being piloted or remediation/intervention/enrichment courses, the following grading scale will be utilized. Course credit will not be given for Pass/Fail classes.

Grading Scale – Pass/Fail
• Pass = 60-100%
• Fail = Below 60%

Weighted Courses
Courses that have weighted grades are indicated in the description of the course. Weighted grades are assigned to classes that are significantly more rigorous and provide students with multiple opportunities to take ownership of their learning.

Honor Roll
Honor Roll recognition is given to students earning a 3.50-3.75 GPA. Principal’s Honor Roll List recognition is given to students who earn a 3.76 GPA or higher.

Parents Right to Know

Parents and guardians may request information regarding the professional qualifications of your child’s classroom teachers, including: whether the teacher has met State qualification and licensing criteria for the grade levels and subject areas in which the teacher provides instruction; whether the teacher is teaching under emergency or other provisional status; the undergraduate major of the teacher and any other graduate certification or degree held by the teacher; and whether your child is provided services by paraprofessionals and, if so, their qualifications.

High School Classes

Math Course Descriptions

Algebra 1
Mathematical practices and modeling with mathematics are embedded into standards for algebra to include the study of number and quantity, functions, reasoning with equations and inequalities, and interpreting categorical and quantitative data. Instructional time and learning focuses on five critical areas: (1) relationships between quantities and reasoning with equations; (2) linear and exponential relationships; (3) descriptive statistics; (4) expressions and equations; and (5) quadratic functions and modeling.

Geometry
Mathematical practices and modeling with mathematics are embedded into standards for geometry to include the study of congruence, similarity, right triangles, and trigonometry, circles, expressing geometric properties with equations, and geometric measurement and dimension. Instructional time and learning focuses on six critical areas: (1) congruence, proof, and constructions; (2) similarity, proof and trigonometry; (3) extending to three dimensions; (4) connecting algebra and geometry through coordinates; (5) circles with and without coordinates; and (6) applications of probability.

Honors Geometry
Mathematical practices and modeling with mathematics are embedded into standards for geometry to include the study of congruence, similarity, right triangles, and trigonometry, circles, expressing geometric properties with equations, and geometric measurement and dimension. Instructional time and learning focuses on six critical areas: (1) congruence, proof, and constructions; (2) similarity, proof and trigonometry; (3) extending to three dimensions; (4) connecting algebra and geometry through coordinates; (5) circles with and without coordinates; and (6) applications of probability. In addition, the curriculum includes rigorous proofs, algebraic representations of geometric concepts, transformational geometry and coordinate geometry. (Weighted Grade: Mid-Level Honor- Added weight of .5 to the regular grading scale)

Algebra 2
This course expands on standards from algebra and geometry. Algebra 2 embeds mathematical practices and modeling with mathematics into standards to include the study of rational exponents, quantitative reasoning, the complex number system, and reasoning with equations and inequalities. Instructional time and learning focuses on four critical areas :(1) polynomials, rational and radical relationships; (2) trigonometric functions; (3) modeling with functions; and (4) connecting algebra and geometry through inferences and conclusions from data.

Honors Algebra 2
A fast paced that expands on standards from algebra and geometry. Honors Algebra 2 embeds mathematical practices and modeling with mathematics into standards to include the study of rational exponents, quantitative reasoning, the complex number system, and reasoning with equations and inequalities. Instructional time and learning focuses on four critical areas :(1) polynomials, rational and radical relationships; (2) trigonometric functions; (3) modeling with functions; and (4) connecting algebra and geometry through inferences and conclusions from data. (Weighted Grade: Mid-Level Honor- Added weight of .5 to the regular grading scale)

Algebra 3
Algebra 3 is a course designed to prepare students for a collegiate level Algebra course. The purpose of this course is to reinforce mathematical symbols, operations, functions and graphing concepts necessary to be successful in higher math courses. The course includes a study of functions and graphs, solutions of equations and inequalities, properties of polynomials, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions.

Personal Finance
This course introduces students to the basics of financial literacy including such topics as creating personal financial goals, saving and investing, banking, using debit and credit cards, making major purchases, paying payroll and other taxes, and purchasing insurance. By emphasizing the importance of setting goals and creating a financial plan, students learn to think before spending. Students will learn how credit scores can impact one’s ability to secure a loan and, in some cases, determine whether they will be hired for a job. Students will also become familiar with some of the reality that faces everyone when they get their first job, their first apartment, or just take on more personal financial responsibilities.

NPC MAT 152 (Trigonometry)
This course presents algebraic concepts at the college level. The approach is intuitive and interactive, with an emphasis on real-life applications and the use of current technologies, particularly graphing calculators. Coursework includes a review of basic algebra then progresses to techniques for solving equations and inequalities both algebraically and graphically. It also covers polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic functions and their graphs as well as sequences, series and combinations. T1-84 graphing calculators are required. Dual-Enrollment course offered through Northland Pioneer College (3 college credit hours). (Weighted Grade: High-Level Honor- Added weight of 1.0 to the regular grading scale)

NPC MAT 189 (Pre-Calculus)
This course covers the algebra and trigonometry necessary for calculus and analytic geometry. The approach is intuitive and interactive, with an emphasis on real-life applications and the use of current technologies, particularly graphing calculators. This course will study the concepts and applications of trigonometric functions, identities, and equations; inverse trigonometric functions, vectors, systems of equations and inequalities, linear programming, matrices and determinants, and conics and polar equations.
T1-84 graphing calculators are required. Dual-Enrollment course offered through Northland Pioneer College (3 college credit hours). (Weighted Grade: High-Level Honor- Added weight of 1.0 to the regular grading scale)

Social Studies Course Descriptions

U.S. Government
U.S. Government is a required semester long course. The course meets the requirements for graduation at Hopi Jr./Sr. High School. Careful attention is given to federal laws and the rationalization behind these laws. American institutions, systems of government, the Constitution and the three branches of American government will be studied in depth.

World Geography
This course includes the geographic and historic development of early civilization and history from the dawn of civilization to the Renaissance period. Students will study the ecological, political, economic, and social changes and transitions that have influenced the western world.

World History
Explores and traces the geographic and historic development of the western world from the Renaissance period to modem day. Emphasizes twentieth century political, economic, social, and ecological trends and developments from World War I through the present.

United States History 1
This course emphasizes the growth and development of the United States from independence to the civil war. A topic organization will be utilized in the study of history. The course will also explore the history of Arizona and its geography, economics, and politics. Careful attention is paid to federal laws and the rationale behind these laws as they relate to the role of the individual and responsible citizenship. The Arizona State Constitution will be studied. The course will also explore the history of Arizona and its geography, economics, and politics. Additionally, the course familiarizes the student with the American economic system. Economic topics such as supply and demand, open markets, consumerism, investments, personal budgets, entrepreneurship, and the changing role of the government in the economic system.

United States History 2
This course emphasizes the growth and development of the United States from the Civil War to the present with an emphasis on the ideals forming American History. The course will also explore the history of Arizona and its geography, economics, and politics. Careful attention is paid to federal laws and the rationale behind these laws as they relate to the role of the individual and responsible citizenship. The Arizona State Constitution will be studied. Additionally, the course familiarizes the student with the American economic system. Economic topics such as supply and demand principles, open markets, consumerism, investments, personal budgets, entrepreneurship, and the changing role of the government in the economic system. The skills of inference will be stressed.

Economics
Economics is a required course for graduation that is a semester in length. The study of economics explains the historical developments and patterns, the results of trade, and the distribution of income and wealth in local, regional, national and world economics. Students will be able to analyze current issues and public policies and to understand the complex relationships among economic, political and cultural systems. The goal is to enable the students to make reasonable judgments about both personal economic questions of economic policy.

Native American Studies
This course will survey Native American Tribes in the United States and provide an in depth study of the organization of the Self Determination Act, the Indian Organization Act, the BIA and national Native American Issues. Analyze and compare cultural traditions such as kinship, childrearing, religion, political systems, language, and relationship to nature within a global context. Analyze, interpret, and discuss the arts of diverse Native American cultures, including worldviews, practices and oral traditions, as expressed in their material culture within an historical context.

Navajo Government
The Dine Government course covering aspects of traditional and contemporary Navajo governmental system such as treaties, tribal codes, resolutions, election process, three branches of government, etc. Students will also gain an understanding of Navajo history & culture from oral traditions to European contact as a way of better conceptualizing the Navajo government. This course is required for the Chief Manuelito Scholarship.

Navajo History
This course traces the historical development of the Navajo tribe beginning with the Emergence and continuing to the modern settlement of the tribe in the four corners region of the United States. Navajo history reflects the pre-Columbian nomadic existence of the tribe to the development of the reservation system

Hopi History/Government
In this course, students will explore the fundamentals of Hopi government, including an investigation of how the system is similar and different from other democratic systems and the role of history and culture of the formation of the government. Students will study the impact of American history on the Hopi nation. Explore the concept of having one nation exist within another and investigate the ways in which tradition impacts governance.

Science Course Descriptions

Integrated Science
The entry level science course for high school and provides the conceptual foundation for the science curriculum. Students will receive instruction and practice in developing and refining scientific skills and methods that are prerequisites for success in subsequent high school science courses. Using mostly Earth Science, chemistry and physics concepts as a framework, students discover and collect evidence that supports the atomic molecular theory of matter. These principles lay the groundwork for understanding all biological and chemical relationships. Topics included in this class are scientific processes, the nature and history of science, earth science (astronomy, geology, hydrology, meteorology, and environmental issues), basic physics and chemistry.

Biology
This course is designed to allow students to obtain a working knowledge of facts and an increased understanding of biology. Students will be introduced to the manner in which scientists work and communicate with each other by performing laboratory experiments, using the scientific method, and writing laboratory reports. Major topics of study include biochemistry, ecology, cells, DNA and heredity, reproduction, genetics, evolution, biotechnology, and sustainability. The course engages students as they explore biological concepts through laboratory experiments, scientific literature and interactive online simulations

Chemistry
The purpose of this course is to provide exploratory experiences, laboratory, and real-life applications in the chemical sciences. This course includes the study of the atom, atomic energy, the formation of molecules, the mathematics of chemistry, and related experimental work. The vocabulary of the chemist is emphasized, as are correct laboratory procedures and techniques. Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of chemical phenomena, facts, laws, definitions, concepts, and theories; chemical vocabulary, terminology, and conventions (including symbols, quantities, and units); scientific instruments and apparatus, including techniques of operation and aspects of safety; scientific quantities and their determination; and scientific and technological applications with their social, economic, and environmental implications.

Environmental Science
This is an interdisciplinary study combining the natural sciences and social sciences. Students will gain an understanding of environmental resources, how natural processes work and how these processes are interconnected. Key environmental laws will be addressed alongside the scientific principles that underpin issues of sustainability and environmental science. The local desert environment and real-world case studies will be emphasized. Laboratory and research activities will include application of proper sampling techniques for water, soil, air, and populations; groundwater well monitoring; wetlands-river system monitoring; investigations; and air quality monitoring.

Anatomy & Physiology
An introductory approach to a complete study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body with emphasis on the various body systems. Application of the scientific method through experiments and hands on activities, such as dissection, are included. Students examine the interactions of body systems as they explore identity, communication, power, movement, protection, and homeostasis. Students design experiments, investigate the structures and functions of the human body. Exploring science in action, students work through interesting real world cases and often play the role of biomedical professionals to solve medical problems.

English Course Descriptions

Achieve 3000 (Utilized in every English Classroom, at every grade level, and in the Reading Lab Courses)
Achieve 3000 is an online methodology for differentiated instruction providing engaging, nonfiction content that supports core curriculum. The Empower Pro program is a uniquely designed to meet the needs of classrooms with a diverse mix of student abilities and needs: every student in class reads the same grade-appropriate content differentiated at their individual reading level, empowering all students to fully participate in individual, small group and whole-class instruction and discussions.

English 9th -12th Grade Reading Labs
Target students will be identified for enrollment in the Reading Lab as an additional elective course. Students reading below grade level and determined to need intervention and support will be placed in the Reading Lab for their grade level. English teachers/counselors recommendations, Galileo, Achieve 3000, and ACT assessments will be utilized to properly identify students. The Reading Labs will assess students to diagnose reading gaps, and accelerate/differentiate learning for the most at-risk students.
For targeted and intensive intervention, Achieve3000 (grades 9-12) accelerates the literacy gains of students who require additional supports and services. Boost’s suite of classroom-tested scaffolds for students and supports for teachers, combined with Achieve3000’s patented methodology and world-class technology, deliver a successful RTI implementation with growth that can be measured by increases in individual reading lexiles.

English 1/2
English 1/2: Students will read various fiction and non-fiction document texts, appropriate for the ninth grade level, as an overview of literature. Scope and sequence will follow the Beyond Textbook framework, which includes the mastery of AZ Language Arts Standards. Literature readings may include at least two department novels/plays, to include Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. Students will use grammar books to develop their grammar skills. Using the writing process, students will write in a variety of forms and for a variety of audiences and purposes, especially focusing on narrative writing, descriptive writing, and incorporating new vocabulary. The Achieve 3000 program will be utilized for differentiated reading/writing instruction.

English 1/2 Honors
Students enrolled in English 1/2 Honors have been identified by the high school academic counselor as at above level grade level proficiency based on their previous reading and writing scores on the Galileo assessment, ACT, and Achieve 3000. Honors English is a course designed for students with advanced English skills and a strong work ethic. The course is a more rigorous version of English 1/2 with additional reading and writing assignments instructed at a faster pace. Students will read a minimum of five additional novels and write one research paper. (Weighted Grade: Mid-Level Honor- Added weight of .5 to the regular grading scale)

English 3/4
Students will read various fiction and non-fiction readings, appropriate for the 10th grade level with a focus on World Literature. Scope and sequence will follow the Beyond Textbook framework, which includes the mastery of AZ Language Arts Standards. Students will read at least two department novels/plays, to include a Shakespearean play. Students will use grammar books to develop their grammar skills. Using the writing process, students will write in a variety of forms and for a variety of audiences and purposes, especially focusing on persuasive essays and formal reports. Students will learn and practice new vocabulary.

English 3/4 Honors
Students enrolled in English 3/4 Honors have been identified by the high school academic counselor as above grade level proficiency based on Galileo assessment, ACT, and Achieve 3000. Honors English is a World Literature course designed for students with advanced English skills and a strong work ethic to accelerate in English coursework. The course is a rigorous version of English 3/4 with additional reading and writing assignments instructed at a faster pace. Students will read a minimum of five additional novels and write one research paper. (Weighted Grade: Mid-Level Honor- Added weight of .5 to the regular grading scale)

English 5/6
Students will read various fiction and non-fiction readings, appropriate for the 11th grade level, a focus will be on American Literature. Scope and sequence will follow the Beyond Textbook framework, which includes the mastery of AZ Language Arts Standards. Students will read at least two department novels/plays, to include a Shakespearean play. Using the six traits writing process, students will write in a variety of forms and for a variety of audiences and purposes, especially focusing on persuasive essays and literary analysis. Grammar will be developed within the context of writing. Students will learn and practice new vocabulary within the context of the course.

English 5/6 Honors
Students enrolled in English 5/6 Honors have been identified by the high school academic counselor as above grade level proficiency based on their previous reading and writing scores on the Galileo Assessment, ACT, and Achieve 3000. Honors English is a course designed for students with advanced English skills and a strong work ethic to accelerate in English coursework. The course is a rigorous version of English 5/6 with additional reading and writing assignments instructed at a faster pace. Students will read a minimum of five additional novels and complete one Shakespearean play in addition to writing one research paper. (Weighted Grade: Mid-Level Honor- Added weight of .5 to the regular grading scale)

English 7/8
Students will read various selections from British Literature and will read at least one English department novels and plays to include a Shakespearean play. Scope and sequence will follow the Beyond Textbook framework, which includes the mastery of AZ Language Arts Standards. Students will write with a focus on literary analysis, informational texts, and rhetorical awareness and will conduct effective research to include a detailed research term paper. Grammar and vocabulary will be developed within the context of reading and PowerPoint demonstration within the six writing traits.

Northland Pioneer College (NPC) English 101/102
This class is a college level essay writing class. Students will write a minimum of three 500 word essays per semester, plus a 1,500-word research paper. In addition, students will read and analyze college level literature. Extensive vocabulary and grammar enrichment and outside reading in the form of two Accelerated Reader books are also components of this class. Students can acquire 6 college credits which meet Arizona Universities’ freshmen composition requirements. A recommendation from your English 5/6 teacher is a preferred prerequisite. The class is offered as a duel enrollment class and is granted college credit with a “C” grade or better in the class with a ten percent differential grade for high school credit. (Weighted Grade: High-Level Honor- Added weight of 1.0 to the regular grading scale)

Journalism/Radio Course Descriptions

Journalism 1/2
Students will learn all facets of print journalism. This will include news, feature, sports and entertainment writing. Students will also learn editing, layout and design, but the focus will be on writing. Students will write for the Hopi High School Bruin Times newspaper.

Journalism 3/4
Students will write, edit, and publish articles, feature stories, and editorials for the Hopi High School Bruin Times newspaper. Course objectives include publishing stories for various publications within the Hopi and Navajo communities and surrounding areas, and publishing stories for regional and national periodicals

Radio 1/2
Students will learn about radio announcing of music, news and sports. Students will also learn radio production, advertising and management, but the focus will be on announcing. Students will participate in joint projects with KUYI FM and possibly other radio stations.

Radio 3/4
Advanced radio students will produce live and recorded radio segments and programs to be played locally on KUYI FM and KINO AM. Additionally, students will submit programs aired nationally on prx.org and National Youth Radio, Boston. Students will announce news briefs, community calendar, news, and sports from Hopi High School and KUYI FM.

Video Broadcasting 1-2 (Beginning video)
Video news is an elective course that is a semester in length. The study of video news teaches video photography, lighting, interviewing, sound and speaking skills. The class includes producing short news or feature interviews for the web as well as possibilities of streaming news and putting together a drama video that could be played at film festivals. Possible partnership videos may be for PBS or Navajo Nation TV.
Students work in groups of three. One student performs the camera work. One student is in charge of audio. One student is the on air personality. Students will begin to learn video editing skills.

Video Broadcasting 3-4 (Advanced video)
This video class centers on students editing their own work, editing other student work and providing mentoring for the other students. Advanced video broadcasting is an elective course that is a semester in length. The study of video news teaches video photography, lighting, interviewing, sound and speaking skills. The class includes producing short news or feature interviews for the web as well as possibilities of streaming news and putting together a drama video that could be played at film festivals. Possible partnership videos may be for PBS or Navajo Nation TV. Students work in groups of three. One student performs the camera work. One student is in charge of audio. One student is the on air personality. Students will begin to learn video editing skills.

Language Course Descriptions

Hopi 1
Students will build communication skills including speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Students will use basic vocabulary associated to people, places, things, and actions related to their own lives. Students will express themselves in phrases, short sentences and memorized material in the preset, present progressive, and past tenses. In addition, students will learn the Hopi culture. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to describe, ask and answer simple questions, engage in simple conversations and carry out simple functions at the Readiness level, as stated in Arizona State Standards.

Hopi 2
Students will continue to build their communication skills including speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Students will use an intermediate level of vocabulary to express themselves in longer sentences and phrases. Students will use the present, present progressive, past, and imperative tenses with greater ease and write a paragraph length material. In addition, students will learn the Hopi culture. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to read, write, listen and speak at the Foundations level, as stated in the Arizona State Standards.

Hopi 3
Building on the first two years of Hopi, students will strengthen their command of spoken and written Hopi. Students will further their vocabulary development through activities that integrate reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Certain grammatical structures are emphasized, especially the use of present, past and future perfect constructions; present and past subjective constructions; present perfect and past perfect subjunctive; conditional sentences; and the passive voice.

Hopi 4
This course incorporates two essential components: an intensive review of Hopi grammar and a series of communicative activities designed to build fluency and competence. Students will give speeches, role-play situations, discuss readings, write essays, and translate short texts from English to Hopi. The focus of Hopi 4 is on improving conversational abilities, increasing the active vocabulary and continuing the development of writing and reading skills in Hopi.

Navajo I
This course will introduce students to basic conversational Navajo. This course is specifically designed for students who do not know how to speak Navajo. Students will develop basic knowledge of speaking, reading and writing Navajo language. Some culture and history will also be covered. Students will be graded primarily on tests, usage and understanding of Navajo Language. This course is required for the Chief Manuelito Scholarship.

Navajo II
This course will prepare students to read, write, and speak in the Navajo Language. This course is specially designed for students who have taken Navajo Language 1. This course will provide students with the necessary requirements to qualify for the Chief Manuelito Scholarship by the Navajo Nation. Students will be evaluated on classroom activities, test/quizzes, and projects according to the Navajo language standards adopted by the Dine Division of Education.

Navajo III & IV
Students will master the sound/letter relationship of: 32 consonants, 4 basic vowels, all diacritics variation and diphthongs. Students will have the foundation of useful Navajo literacy. The student will show competence in reading and writing. By the end of the course, students will be expected to spell at a level such that their writing will be comprehensible. The student will also become familiar with the basic terminology of the grammar of Navajo.

Spanish 1
In this course, students are introduced to the five C’s of foreign language learning: communication, culture, connections, comparisons and communities. Students will learn the fundamental structures of the language by engaging in brief conversations, directed dialogues, and a variety of oral activities. In addition, short reading passages, aural comprehension, writing activities, and grammar are integral components of the program.

Spanish 2
In this course, students are introduced to the five C’s of foreign language learning: communication, culture, connections, comparisons and communities as a modified pace with more support. Students will learn the fundamental structure of the language by engaging in brief conversations, directed dialogues, and a variety of oral activities, as well as short readings and writing activities. Although all skills are practiced, the listening and speaking skills are emphasized.

Spanish 3
Spanish 3 is a continuation of Spanish 2 and continues to develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students will increase their vocabulary, learn new grammatical concepts, and develops deeper understanding of the culture. At this stage, students will practice the skill of speaking through class discussions and presentations. Moreover, students will begin to write compositions on a variety of topics.

Spanish 4
Spanish 4 is a continuation of Spanish 3 and continues to develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students will continue to increase their vocabulary, learn new grammatical concepts, and develop a deeper understanding of Hispanic cultures and communities. Students will practice and further develop speaking skills through class discussions, partner and group speaking activities and presentation. Moreover, students will continue to write short compositions

Physical Education Course Descriptions

Physical Education/Grades 9-12
Hopi High School promotes the overall importance of their students’ health and wellness through physical activities. Activities include: Baseball, Volleyball, Soccer, Softball, Mush-ball, Floor hockey, Flag Football, Ultimate Frisbee, Bowling, Aerobics, and Tag Games. Individual activities include 1/4 mile and 1/2 mile run/walk, push-ups, sit-ups/crunches, trunk lifts, pacer runs and jumping rope. Meeting physical activity standards include both the promotion of physical activity and the promotion of lifelong activity that will enhance their overall quality of life both in the workplace and in their everyday lives. Achieving these standards results in students learning real life skills. Higher order skills include decision making and problem solving which is necessary to become overall better citizens of their community. There are three major sport areas provided in Physical Education classes: Team Sports, Leisure Sports, and a Fitness Test. Team Sports include Flag Football, Softball, Volleyball, Basketball, Soccer, Floor Hockey, Mush Ball, Ultimate Frisbee, and Team Handball. Leisure sports instruction includes Archery, Bowling, and Badminton. There will be a Presidential Fitness Test administered at the end of the course.

Sports Activities/Grades 9-12
There are three major sport areas provided in Sports Activities classes: Team Sports, Leisure Sports, and a Fitness Test. Hopi High School promotes the overall importance of their students’ health and wellness through physical activities. To accomplish this we approved three major sport areas: Team Sports, Leisure Sports and a Fitness Test. Team Sports: Flag Football, Softball, Volleyball, Basketball, Soccer, Floor Hockey, Mush Ball, Ultimate Frisbee, and Team Handball. Leisure Sports: Archery, Bowling, Tennis, and Badminton. Fitness Test: There will be a Presidential Fitness Test administered at the end of the course. Prerequisite: Physical Education/Health

Beginning Weights
This is an activity class that requires the students to dress out and participate. Students will learn safety rules so they can lift safely and reduce the risk of injury. The student will also learn about the importance of nutrition and how it helps develop the body. We will be on the Bigger Faster Stronger program that the students will be able to use throughout life. In beginning weights students will learn how to do the following lifts: Power cleans, bench press, box squats, parallel squats, front squats, trap bar dead lift, and various lifts that help the body move with strength and endurance. We will be doing speed training with chutes speed harness, and speed hurdles.

Advanced Weights
This class will offer similar skills as beginning weights but will include two advanced weights components Power snatch and polymeric jumping and running. All classes are required to record lifts and keep a portfolio. This will help the student track his/her improvement. Evaluation of students will consist of dressing out, participation, written tests and portfolio. Each will carry 25% of the grade.

Music Course Descriptions

Beginning Band
This course is designed to acquaint the student with band instruments, performance, and the elements of music. Students will learn techniques, styles, basic music theory, and care and maintenance of the instrument. Styles of music include marches, concert music, as well as music from movie/TV soundtracks. Marching Band is also included in the Fall semester of the course. There will be opportunities to travel to local schools to showcase the music program.

Advanced Band 1-4
This course is designed to further acquaint the student with intermediate band music as well as continued progress on the instrument and performance. Other musical styles, such as Jan and Rock, will also be explored within this course. There will be opportunities to travel to local schools to showcase the music program. Students must have a minimum of 1 year of playing experience prior to enrolling in the course. Prerequisite: Beginning Band or audition for placement.

Beginning Guitar
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the guitar, performance and the elements of music. Students will learn various styles associated with the guitar such as folk, classical, jazz, and rock. Students will learn a variety of chords, scales, as well as note- reading, and compositional techniques. Students will perform music in a solo and ensemble format. There will be opportunities to travel to other school to showcase the music program. Course may be repeated.

Intermediate and Advanced Guitar 1-4
This course is designed to further acquaint the student with intermediate techniques associated with the guitar. Emphasis will be on advanced chords, note- reading, practice habits, composing original music and performance. Students will continue to perform in a solo and ensemble format. There will be opportunities to travel to local schools to showcase the music program. Students must have a minimum of 1 year of playing experience prior to enrolling in the course. Prerequisite Beginning guitar or audition for placement.

Beginning Percussion
Exploration of percussion techniques on a wide variety of instruments including snare drum, bass drum, timpani, cymbals, triangle, tambourine, drum set, djembe, congas, maracas, chimes, and glockenspiel. Student will explore various genres of music including jazz, rock, marching concert, Afro-Cuban and African.

Beginning Piano Class
This class will introduce students to the fundamental techniques of piano/keyboard performance. Chording techniques and scales will be covered, but most importantly students will learn to interpret symbols to read and interact with the language that is music. A variety of beginning musical styles will be studied, and opportunities for performance in class and outside of class will be made available.

Career and Technical Education (CTE)

Automotive A/B
This class is designed to prepare students for jobs requiring skills in the maintenance and repair of automotive electrical and electronic, suspension, steering, and braking systems; and, the diagnosis and repair of engine performance problems. This program also prepares students for the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) technician certification exams. In addition to technical skills, students completing this program will also develop advanced critical thinking, career development, applied academic, and leadership skills required for entry into the Automotive Technology occupations. At this time, the program uses a delivery system made up of two integral parts: Format/technical instruction and experiential education.

Carpentry Technology A/B
This course is designed to cover layout and design, machine wood working tools, and equipment maintenance. This is an advanced course for the student serious about wood working as a career. Emphasis will be placed upon the acquisition of carpentry skills.

Finished Carpentry A/B
This advanced woods class prepares students for employment in jobs specializing in rough and finish carpentry, construction materials, estimating and blueprint reading. In addition to technical skills, students completing this program will also develop advanced critical thinking, applied academic, life management, business economic and leadership skills required to enter the Carpentry occupations. At this time the program uses a delivery system made up of two integral parts: formal/technical instruction and experiential education. Components of this class include form setting, wood/metal stud framing, floor and roof systems, and other areas specific to this trade.

Welding A/B
This Level III program is designed to prepare students to apply technical knowledge and skills to unite or separate materials using a variety of techniques and joining processes required for welding occupations in the service, manufacturing and building industries. In addition to technical skills, students completing this program will also develop advanced critical thinking, applied academic, life management, business, economic and leadership skills required to enter the Welding occupations. At this time, the program uses a delivery system made up of two integral parts: formal/technical instruction and experiential education. Components of this class include Oxyacetylene cutting, brazing and welding along with related skills. The advanced course includes Electric Arc welding, Metallic Inert Gas (MIG) welding, and Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding. This course will incorporate computer training in creating two dimensional production drawings. Coursework examines features, commands, and techniques for creating, editing, and painting with Auto CAD computer application program. Hands on experience will be performed in both printed and on-line format.

Introduction to Cooking
Cooking class provides students with the opportunity to learn proper food preparation procedures and nutrition and health information. This class is for the student who is interested in the foods related careers and HRM field.

Hopi Traditional Cooking
Hopi traditional cooking class is an introductory course in Hopi food preparation and Hopi native edible plants. The class will introduce students to recipes using Hopi whole com, blue and white com flour, beans, bread, various meats and wild game, chiles, greens, seed snacks, squash, and beverages. Students will learn where and how to find edible plants in spring and summer and learn how to identify spring and summer traditional edible plants. Students will prepare and sample various food creations throughout the school year incorporating the Hopi Office of Health Services’ Hopi Cookbook.

Culinary Arts
Culinary Arts is a two semester elective open to 11th and 12th grades. Culinary Arts is a vocational course designed to help the student understand the food-service industry which offers a clear path to a career in the food service and hospitality industry, as it becomes more competitive, students will need appropriate skills. Students will be learning the food industry through the use of texts, time clock, time cards, research with the use of internet, field trips and through practical activities which will be performed through food labs. Sanitation and Safety are paramount to success in the lab along with participation. A lot of emphasis in the course will be geared towards the standards, laws and regulations of the industry, management and employability skills.

Computers
Computer class applies a hands-on approach in teaching business computer applications such as word processing and electronic spreadsheets in a Windows operating system environment. Computer class is a high school graduation requirement and emphasizes computer programming, the use of the Internet, and aspects of the computer occupations. Computer class provides students with a familiarity with computer hardware and sufficient knowledge of commonly used software, both of which are necessary for effective participation in today’s personal, academic, and career-related computer use environments. Computer class uses a hands-on approach in teaching students to use database management and multimedia presentation software. Students will also develop an increased awareness of occupations and career options available to them. The emphasis of this course is on a computer usage and will provide students with an increased familiarity of computer software commonly used in business today.

Fundamentals of Visual Communication
This course will provide basic instruction in traditional methods of drawing, pencil, charcoal, conté, pastels, pen and ink, and chalk. It will also examine basics in painting, utilizing tempera, watercolor, and acrylic painting techniques. Printmaking will include linoleum block printing techniques, and mono printing. Each unit will emphasize basic steps to complete an art project from its inception to the finishing touches. Various other units on landscape drawing, sketching, art history, and others will be included on a shortened and rotating schedule between units. This class will be structured with demonstrations, slides, guest speakers, and group/individualized critiques and discussions. Contemporary and historical artists will be addressed. Individual research and readings will be assigned.

Advanced Fundamentals of Visual Communication
This course will provide advanced instruction in traditional hand building techniques in clay surface design techniques, and acrylic painting techniques. Each unit will emphasize basic steps to complete an art project from its inception to the finishing touches. Various other units on drawing sketching, art history, and others will be included on a shortened and rotating schedule between units. The class will be structured with demonstrations, slides, guest speakers, and group/individualized critiques and discussions. Contemporary and historical artists will be addressed. Individual research and readings will be assigned.

Introduction to Ceramics
This course is designed to introduces students to hand-building and wheel throwing techniques of clay, and to incorporate concepts/ideas to personalize each student’s unique expression of art through various clay projects. Techniques that will be acquired through learning during the semester will include, pinch, coil, slab building, and wheel thrown procedures. Ceramic surfaces will also be explored by using a range of glazes, under-glazes, and non-traditional methods of decorating clay. Techniques and concepts will develop as a result of studio class time, teacher demonstrations, video/Star Board technology, and group/individual critiques. In addition to the technical aspect of the course, students will be challenged to think about the work they are creating, and how it relates to historical and contemporary views/interests in today’s world. Students will be introduced to and gain the understanding of the firing and glazing process. Students will gain an understanding of the clay properties demanding attention and patience for desired outcomes, requiring that the student become comfortable with experimentation and failure with clay techniques.

Introduction to Screen Printing
This course is designed to introduce students to the process and techniques of screen printing, and will incorporate concepts and ideas to personalize each student’s unique expression of art through learned screen-printing techniques. Students will be printing on fabric materials throughout the course, but screen printing techniques can be applied to other materials such as paper, wood and metal. Techniques that will be acquired throughout the semester will include, plastic stencil method, drawing fluid/screen filler method, and photographic method. Techniques and concepts will be developed as a result of studio class time, teacher demonstrations, video/Star Board technology and group/individual critiques. In addition to the technical aspect of the course, students will be challenged to think about the work they are creating, and how it relates to historical and contemporary views/interests in today’s world. Students will be introduced to and gain the understanding of the printing process of using the three basic screen printing techniques on fabric materials.

Native American Arts/Crafts
This course provides an introduction to contemporary forms of Native American Arts and craft design. It is a hands-on learning environment. Students will create a variety of plastic canvas crafts, needle crafting, and one-of-a kind home decorations and fun accessories, utilizing, plastic canvases.

Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC)

Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) LET 1-4
The Army Junior ROTC program has been developed out of a historical background of over 75 years of experience to meet changing educational philosophies and concepts of today’s institutions of secondary education. The program remains flexible to permit adjustments necessary to meet the needs of the cadets, school district and community. The program is an excellent vehicle for practical application of leadership and citizenship theory for high school students. Physical fitness is stressed as a way of life. Instructional Objective: “To Make Better Citizens of Young Adults” Major Learning Objectives include: Appreciation of the ethical values and principles that underlie good citizenship which includes: integrity, responsibility and respect for constituted authority. Development of leadership potential with the abilities to live and work cooperatively with others; Ability to think logically and to communicate both orally and in writing; Appreciation of the importance of physical fitness in maintaining good health. Evaluations of students are by their peers and the JROTC instructors on their daily assignments and activities. Final grades are based on daily activities, assignments, quizzes and final examinations. A complete Class A Army uniform will be issued and altered for all students.

College Course Readiness/Enrichment/Alternative Education

AVID (Secondary Elective Courses) Grades 7-12
AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) is a national college and career readiness system. AVID Secondary equips teachers and schools with what they need to help these students succeed on a path to college and career success. Students take the AVID Elective Course for one period a day, students receive the additional academic, social, and emotional support that will help them succeed in their school’s most rigorous courses. Hopi Jr./Sr. High offers AVID Elective classes for each grade level (7th-12th grade).
The power of AVID Secondary is the ability to impact students in the AVID Elective class and all students throughout the campus. AVID Secondary can have an effect on the entire school by providing classroom activities, teaching practices, and academic behaviors that can be incorporated into any classroom to improve engagement and success for all students.

GATE Course (Gifted and Talented)
Hopi Jr./Sr. High School offers a variety of programming options for gifted students, one of them is the opportunity to participate in the GATE course. Secondary gifted students are served through a resource model, in which GATE students are grouped with other gifted students a portion of each week and receive specialized instruction from a gifted teacher. Gifted education is an integral part of HJSHS total educational program. Gifted students are provided differentiated lessons and challenging educational opportunities, which revolve around project based learning experiences in the classroom. Students work on higher-level thinking activities using age appropriate materials. They are provided opportunities for complex, in-depth study designed to build thinking, research, communication, and technology skills.

Gifted and Talented Education (GATE Program)
The GATE program provides a continuum of learning experiences to address the sequential and developmental needs of gifted students. Teaching methods include but are not limited to: direct instruction, guided practice, independent assignments, cooperative group activities, learning games, and planned experiences.
Many students at Hopi Jr./Sr. High School possess exceptional abilities and potential which cannot be fully developed through the regular curriculum. These students learn more quickly, think deeply and creatively about a wide variety of topics, and communicate effectively in many ways. Therefore, these students need to be challenged and helped to develop their abilities. In keeping with the District’s goal of developing the special abilities of each student, programs for the gifted and talented are an essential component of the Hopi Jr./Sr. High School’s educational services. The gifted program is designed to provide challenge and to supplement and enhance the regular curriculum. The program emphasizes history and culture, communication and expression, and critical thinking and problem solving.

The State of Arizona defines a gifted child as: “…a child of lawful school age who due to superior intellect, advanced learning ability or both, is not afforded an opportunity for otherwise attainable progress and development in regular classroom instruction and who needs special instruction, special ancillary services or both to achieve a level of commensurate with his intellect and ability.”
Hopi Jr./Sr. High School further defines a gifted child as “… one who demonstrates exceptional achievement and/or potential ability in any of the following areas: general intellectual ability, specific academic aptitude, leadership capacity, creative or productive thinking, visual and performing arts.”
Because of these abilities, these students require differentiated education services in order to fully realize their contribution to self society. The State of Arizona requires that districts “shall provide to gifted pupils special education commensurate with their academic abilities and potentials,” and that they must “provide for routine screening for gifted pupils using one or more tests adopted by the State Board.” In addition, “Local Governing Boards shall adopt policies for the education of gifted students which shall include:
1. Procedures for identification and placement of students in gifted programs.
2. Curriculum, differentiated instruction and supplemental services for gifted students.
3. Parent involvement.
4. The scope and sequence shall be a written program description, which demonstrates
articulation across all grades and schools to ensure opportunities for continuous progress…” and must include eight specific components.

Services for the gifted and talented are different from the regular curriculum in several ways. These services offer the students a chance to explore their abilities from new and deeper perspectives. The goals of all gifted services are to develop conceptual understandings and skills in history and culture, communication and expression, and critical thinking and problem solving. The students will be responsible for a higher level of mastery in the regular classroom relating to their giftedness. A recommendation form can be filled out by community members, staff, parents or the student themselves. Form can be obtained at Hopi Jr./Sr. High School.

Information about the student is collected from several different sources. All students who have been referred will take a selected group or individual intelligence test(s) that include a measure of verbal, quantitative and nonverbal abilities. The tests are selected from a list of state- approved tests for identification of gifted. Parents must sign an authorization before tests are administered.
Testing will be available to students as least two times per year and is currently scheduled for September and January. Students who score in the 70th percentile or above on the verbal, quantitative or nonverbal measures of an approved group or individual test of intelligence will be eligible for placement in the Hopi Jr./Sr. High School’s Gifted Education Program. Parents, the student’s classroom teacher, and the building administrator will be notified following the testing. Written parental approval will be required before the student can participate in the program.

PATH Academy (Alternative Education)
Hopi High School recognizes the necessity for students to complete high school and aspire to post-secondary career goals. Students who have lost credits in their freshman and sophomore years due to failing grades, attendance deficiencies, or socio-emotional factors have an opportunity to reclaim those credits through an alternative education credit recovery program.
The PATH Academy:
P-romoting Academic Achievement
A-ccelerated Learning
T-Technology and Support
H-Helping Students Succeed

The program is an accredited computer based credit recovery program named as “Edgenuity.” Curriculum titles include language arts, process writing, grammar and writing, high school English, mathematics, sciences, social sciences, Spanish, college readiness, electives and assessments.

Students are selected by the high school academic counselor to participate in the PATH Program based on credits lost during their freshman and sophomore years in high school. Students who are juniors or seniors will be selected based on courses required for graduation requirements and credit recovery. Students will be taken out of at least one elective class during the school day and reassigned to the Alternative Program. Each student will have an individual education plan (IEP), developed for them by the high school academic counselor and PATH Program Coordinator. The IEP will be reflective of the credit recovery requirements each student will need. Students will enter into a contractual agreement that requires them to complete three one half credit courses successfully during each semester in order to remain a participant in the Alternative Program. Failure to meet contractual agreements will result in being removed from the program
Students may complete more than the required three one half credit courses for credit recovery within their IEP by completing course work before, after school and/or during summer session. Upon completion of designated coursework, students will be awarded high school credit toward graduation by the registrar after verification by the high school counselor and PATH Program Coordinator.

NPC Talon
Northland Pioneer College’s Project TALON (Technology to Advance Learning Outcomes at Northland) delivers general education college courses to high school students during the regular school day at HJSHS. NPC professors utilize high-definition, technology-connected classrooms to teach advanced Mathematics, College Composition, Spanish, Economics and American Government courses, with students earning dual credits — applying toward their high school diploma and college degree. All of the college course credits are guaranteed to transfer to any Arizona community college or public university. (Weighted Grade: High-Level Honor- Added weight of 1.0 to the regular grading scale)

Junior High School Classes

English Course Descriptions

Seventh Grade English Language Arts
The course integrates reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language skills. Students will read literary selections from the seventh grade text, along with novel selections. In addition, students will use grammar books and workbooks to develop basic grammar skills. Using the writing process, students will write in a variety of forms and for a variety of audiences and purposes while learning and practicing new vocabulary.

Seventh Grade Honors English Language Arts
The course integrates reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language skills. Students will read literary selections from the seventh grade text, along with novel selections. In addition, students will use grammar books and workbooks to develop basic grammar skills. Using the writing process, students will write in a variety of forms and for a variety of audiences and purposes while learning and practicing new vocabulary. It is designed for those students who possess the motivation and skills necessary for the honors classroom and who are ready to more deeply connect writing and reading.

Eighth Grade English Language Arts
The course integrates reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language skills. Students will read literary selections from the seventh grade text, along with novel selections. In addition, students will use grammar books and workbooks to develop basic grammar skills. Using the writing process, students will write in a variety of forms and for a variety of audiences and purposes while learning and practicing new vocabulary.

Eighth Grade Honors English Language Arts
The course integrates reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language skills. Students will read literary selections from the seventh grade text, along with novel selections. In addition, students will use grammar books and workbooks to develop basic grammar skills. Using the writing process, students will write in a variety of forms and for a variety of audiences and purposes while learning and practicing new vocabulary. It is designed for those students who possess the motivation and skills necessary for the honors classroom and who are ready to more deeply connect writing and reading.

Reading Lab 7
The Reading Lab is a skills class designed to assist students in improving their reading comprehension and vocabulary through lab work utilizing the Achieve 3000 program. Achieve 3000 provides students with differentiated instruction based on their Lexile Level. The reading tasks are designed to allow for additional practice and mastery of English Language Arts concepts presented in class. In addition, the lab includes technology, books, tapes, and workbooks which may be utilized.

Reading Lab 8
The Reading Lab is a skills class designed to assist students in improving their reading comprehension and vocabulary through lab work utilizing the Achieve 3000 program. Achieve 3000 provides students with differentiated instruction based on their Lexile Level. The reading tasks are designed to allow for additional practice and mastery of English Language Arts concepts presented in class. In addition, the lab includes technology, books, tapes, and workbooks which may be utilized.

Math Course Descriptions

Seventh Grade Mathematics
Seventh grade math is designed to help students understand the basics of mathematics and pre-algebra. Students will use mental arithmetic, paper and pencil, calculators, and computers to develop problem-solving skills with numbers, fractions, decimals, measurement, graphs, geometry and algebra. These skills will help them understand and participate in the world around them.

Seventh Grade Mathematics Honors
This course is designed to prepare students for algebra and improve their prior mathematical skills. Students will use their mental skills, calculators, paper and pencil, protractors, computers, and manipulatives to solve math problems. This class also emphasizes cooperative learning, problem-solving and hands-on learning. These are skills that students will use in future math classes and in every day life.

Eighth Grade Mathematics
Eighth grade general math is designed to prepare students for Algebra I and improve their prior mathematics and pre-algebra skills. Students will use mental skills, calculators, paper and pencil, protractors, and manipulatives to solve math problems. Students should be able to demonstrate their understanding of operations and properties, data analysis and statistics, area and volume, basic algebraic equations, number theory, fractions and mixed numbers ratios and proportions, percentages, and geometry.

Eighth Grade Algebra I
Mathematical practices and modeling with mathematics are embedded into standards for algebra to include the study of number and quantity, functions, reasoning with equations and inequalities, and interpreting categorical and quantitative data. Instructional time and learning focuses on five critical areas: (1) relationships between quantities and reasoning with equations; (2) linear and exponential relationships; (3) descriptive statistics; (4) expressions and equations; and (5) quadratic functions and modeling. This course is identical to Algebra I and earns the 8th grade student enrolled in the course, one math credit on their high school transcript. The letter grade received in this course will be documented on the high school transcript and will be factored into the student’s high school GPA.

Science Course Descriptions

Seventh Grade Science
Seventh grade science is a course designed to acquaint students with the nature of earth science, space, living systems, inquiry and societal issues related to timely environmental concerns. Much of the course is devoted to teaching study skills that students will need in subsequent science courses in their high school careers. Laboratory and hands-on activities are an important and integral component of this course. Additionally, students will be exposed to invited experts in various appropriate careers related to biology and the environmental sciences.

Eighth Grade Physical Science
Eighth grade students are introduced to the basic principles of the scientific method, the periodic table, chemical reactions, and the natures of science including and not limited to genetics, and biological concerns. Much of the course work is dedicated to teaching study and lab skills that will be used once they promote to high school level courses. Laboratory and hands-on activities are important and integral component of this course. Additionally, students will be exposed to invited experts in various appropriate careers related to biology and environmental concerns.

Eighth Grade Physical Science Honors
Eighth grade students are introduced to the basic principles of the scientific method, the periodic table, chemical reactions, and the natures of science including and not limited to genetics, and biological concerns. Much of the course work is dedicated to teaching study and lab skills that will be used once they promote to high school level courses. Laboratory and hands-on activities are important and integral component of this course. Additionally, students will be exposed to invited experts in various appropriate careers related to biology and environmental concerns. It is designed for those students who possess the motivation and skills necessary for the honors classroom and who are ready to more deeply connect in areas and topics related to science.

Social Studies Course Descriptions

Seventh Grade Social Studies
Students analyze the human experience through time, recognize the relationships of events and people, and interpret significant patterns, themes, ideas, beliefs, and turning points in Arizona, American and world history. Students analyze locations, regions, and spatial connections, recognizing the natural and cultural processes that impact the way in which people and societies live and interact with each other and their environment. Study skills, note taking, critical thinking and writing skills are developed in this course.

Eighth Grade Social Studies
Students understand the ideals, rights and responsibilities of citizenship, and the content, sources, and history of the founding documents of the United States, with particular emphasis on the U.S. Constitution and how the United States government functions at the local, state, national, and international levels.

Physical Education Course Description

Seventh and Eighth Grade Physical Education
Hopi Jr./Sr. High School promotes the overall importance of their students’ health and wellness through physical activities. Activities may include: Baseball, Volleyball, Soccer, Softball, Mush-ball, Floor Hockey, Flag Football, Ultimate Frisbee, Bowling, Aerobics, and Tag Games. Individual activities include 1/4 – 1/2 mile run/walk, push-ups, sit-ups/scrunches, trunk lifts, pacer runs and jumping rope. Meeting physical activity standards include both the promotion of physical activity and the promotion of lifelong activity that will enhance their overall quality of life both in the workplace and in their everyday lives. Achieving these standards results in students learning real life skills. Higher order thinking skills include decision making and problem solving which is necessary to become overall better citizen of their community.

College Course Readiness/Enrichment Course Descriptions

AVID 7
AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) is a national program designed to support and assist selected students with a college preparatory curriculum that emphasizes analytical writing, note taking, organization, and research. The AVID class has two goals: the first, to prepare students for college and university entrance requirements, and the second, to ready students for the rigors of college and university work. This course is a structured, college preparatory system.

AVID 8
AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) is a national program designed to support and assist selected students with a college preparatory curriculum that emphasizes analytical writing, note taking, organization, and research. The AVID class has two goals: the first, to prepare students for college and university entrance requirements, and the second, to ready students for the rigors of college and university work. This course is a structured, college preparatory system.

PBL-STEM (Piloted Course for 2018-2019 SY for Pass/Fail Grade)
This course introduces students to STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) experiences in a project based learning (PBL) environment and connects these experiences to math and science standards. The goal of STEM is to foster a learning environment in which students are guided to produce original ideas, objects, and structures according to certain specifications using concepts from math, science, and technology.

Elective Course Descriptions

Seventh Grade Hopi
An introductory course in the basic elements of the Hopi Language. Seventh grade students will gain a general awareness about the Hopi language and its oral use. Additionally, students will learn about various aspects of Hopi culture and be exposed to the Hopi language in its written form. The course is adjusted to the age level of the students and is culturally sensitive to younger students.

Eighth Grade Hopi
Eighth grade students will gain an advanced knowledge about the Hopi Language utilizing written vocabulary and increased fluency in classroom activities. Students will learn about various aspects of Hopi culture and will incorporate aspects of the language in the classroom setting. The course is adjusted to the age level of the students and is culturally sensitive to younger students.

Eighth Grade Radio
An introductory course. Students will learn about radio announcing of music, news, and sports. Students will also learn about radio production, advertising, and management, but the focus will be on announcing.

Eighth Grade Beginning Guitar
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the guitar, performance, and the elements of music. Students will learn various styles associated with the guitar such as folk, classical, jazz, and rock. Students will learn a variety of chords, scales, as well as note-reading, and compositional techniques. Students will perform music in solo and ensemble format.

Eighth Grade Woods
This class will cover wood technology, construction, pattern making, drafting and design, shop math, and career essentials. Projects will increase in difficulty. Safety will be stressed.

Eighth Grade Computers
Computer class applies hands-on approach in teaching business computer applications such as word processing and electronic spreadsheets in a Windows operating system environment. This course focuses on establishing basic computer skills. Computer terminology and keyboarding skills are stressed.

Seventh Grade Art
Students are introduced to the art room and all its possibilities, the different media, the exemplars (examples of famous art), as well as art examples produced by other students. The course tries to stimulate a love for art in students. The course encourages creativity and stimulates the student’s desire to continue experimenting in art. The instructor incorporates new art vocabulary terms as the class talks about artistic renderings. The instructor tries to help students develop skills in the creation of their own artwork. Assignments include drawing, painting, graphic design, architecture, sculpture, and multicultural projects. Students will keep daily art journals with the purpose of encouraging daily drawing. Students are introduced to all the basic elements of design: line, shape, value, texture, color, space, and form; Principles of Design: balance, unity, contrast, emphasis, movement, rhythm and pattern. Students do assignments on each of the elements and principles and are encouraged to be as creative as possible. The class also studies are periods and artists, culminating in a presentation by each student of an artist of their choosing.

Seventh Grade Native Arts and Design
This course provides an introduction to contemporary forms of Native American Arts and craft design. It is a hands-on learning environment. Students will create a variety of plastic canvas crafts, needle crafting, and one-of-a kind home decorations and fun accessories, utilizing, plastic canvases.